Connect with us

Latest News

A bug meant Twitter Fleets could still be seen after they disappear

Published

on

Twitter is the latest social media site to allow users to experiment with posting disappearing content. Fleets, as Twitter calls them, allows its mobile users post short stories, like photos or videos with overlaying text, that are set to vanish after 24 hours.

But a bug meant that fleets weren’t deleting properly and could still be accessed long after 24 hours had expired. Details of the bug were posted in a series of tweets on Saturday, less than a week after the feature launched.

The bug effectively allowed anyone to access and download a user’s fleets without triggering a notification that the user’s fleet had been read and by whom. The implication is that this bug could be abused to archive a user’s fleets after they expire.

Using an app that’s designed to interact with Twitter’s back-end systems via its developer API. What returned was a list of fleets from the server. Each fleet had its own direct URL, which when opened in a browser would load the fleet as an image or a video. But even after the 24 hours elapsed, the server would still return links to fleets that had already disappeared from view in the Twitter app.

When reached, a Twitter spokesperson said a fix was on the way. “We’re aware of a bug accessible through a technical workaround where some Fleets media URLs may be accessible after 24 hours. We are working on a fix that should be rolled out shortly.”

Twitter acknowledged that the fix means that fleets should now expire properly, it said it won’t delete the fleet from its servers for up to 30 days — and that it may hold onto fleets for longer if they violate its rules. We checked that we could still load fleets from their direct URLs even after they expire.

Fleet with caution.

Lyron Foster is a Hawaii based African American Musician, Author, Actor, Blogger, Filmmaker, Philanthropist and Multinational Serial Tech Entrepreneur.

Latest News

Carbon Monoxide Leak Leaves 18 Dead At Coal Mine In Southwest China

Published

on

Rescuers adjust an emergency generator at the Diaoshuidong coal mine in southwest China on Saturday after a carbon monoxide leak at the facility left 18 dead. Rescue efforts were underway to reach five others still trapped underground.

Workers were inside the shuttered mine to dismantle equipment when dangerous levels of carbon monoxide began to seep into the air.

(Image credit: AFP via Getty Images)

Continue Reading

Latest News

Maduro Allies Set To Win Back Venezuela’s Congress In Vote Boycotted By Opposition

Published

on

Diosdado Cabello (left), a candidate in Venezuela

The president’s loyalists are poised to sweep the National Assembly elections Sunday, adding to the litany of woes facing his chief rival, Juan Guaidó.

(Image credit: Ariana Cubillos/AP)

Continue Reading

Latest News

‘He Will Be A Happier Elephant’: Vet Describes What It Was Like To Rescue Kaavan

Published

on

Dr. Amir Khalil, a veterinarian from the international animal welfare organization Four Paws International, comforts Kaavan during his examination at the zoo in Islamabad, before Kaavan is transported to Cambodia.

Dr. Amir Khalil, a veterinarian with Four Paws International, tells NPR that the “world’s loneliest elephant” is settling into his new home in Cambodia. He sang Sinatra’s “My Way” to help calm Kaavan.

(Image credit: Anjum Naveed/NPR)

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 Latin America Business News

en_USEnglish
es_COSpanish en_USEnglish